Virginia Tech-Wofford Review: Offensive Trends

Virginia Tech
The Virginia Tech offense has to clean some things up. (Ivan Morozov)

Going in, I figured I had three potential topics. I could write about the second- and third-stringers if the Hokies cruised. I could write about the offense’s struggles if things were uncomfortable for a stretch (and it would be the Hokie offense, because Wofford wasn’t going to move the ball against the starting defense.) Or, I could write about the App State game if my heart couldn’t take the final score…maybe walk around King Street and campus and report on all that I saw so that we could live vicariously through it.

Well, the Hokies won, and my MVPs are William Ross and Peter Moore for not allowing Wofford a 0-0 spirit boost in the first quarter, so you can guess how this is going to go.

To be fair, the Hokies were tighter on offense than we’ve seen so far this year. Quarterback and receiver were usually on the same page. Everyone involved in pass-protection held up better against blitzes and stunts. Tech pushed the ball down the field. Absent receivers came to life. And the Hokies picked up some yards.


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On the other hand, this was an FCS squad using a peculiar brand of bend-but-don’t-break defense. The Hokies should have piled up yards. But of all things, the running game—specifically the run-blocking—wasn’t impressive, and an experienced Wofford coaching staff occasionally showed up the Hokies’ offensive coaches. The Hokies went out there and attacked all the things Wofford struggled against—crossing routes and moving the pocket in particular—and most of those attacks were repulsed. Meanwhile, Wofford sat back and absorbed Tech’s offense. I think it was about more than shortening the game. I think

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