2006 VT NFL Draft Preview

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The 2005 Virginia Tech football team is perhaps the most talented Hokie team ever, and that is expected to show up in the 2006 NFL Draft. The
Hokies could have as many as four players taken in the first three rounds of the draft, and they all hail from the defensive side of the ball.

Considering the Hokies finished first in the nation in total defense and 57th in total offense, this isn’t surprising. The four Virginia Tech
defenders expected to be the first Hokies taken in the draft are the only full-time starters Tech loses off the defense heading into 2006. Let’s
take a look at the Tech players that are most likely to be drafted.

Jimmy
Williams, CB, 6-2 3/8, 213

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Pick 11
Great Blue North: #22 prospect
CNNSI: Late First Round
Draft Board Insider: Pick 31
ESPN: #17 overall prospect, First Round pick

Williams is considered by many scouts to be the top cornerback prospect in the 2006 NFL Draft. He is also considered by some to be a head case
whose attitude will drop him into the bottom half of the first round, and perhaps to the very bottom of the first round.

Pros: Williams has a big-time NFL body. He would perhaps be the most physically imposing cornerback in the NFL, and he certainly has the size to
play safety as well. His versatility makes him a very attractive prospect. He is a hard-hitter and is outstanding in run support.

Cons: Besides a suspect attitude, Williams had a very inconsistent senior season. He isn’t a very effective player in space and at times he can
play a bit out of control. He will bite on the play action.

Darryl
Tapp, DE, 6-1 5/8, 252

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Round 2, Pick 55
Great Blue North: #56 prospect
CNNSI: Mid-Fourth Round
Draft Board Insider: Round 3, Pick 78
ESPN: #37 overall, Second Round Pick

Tapp is considered one of the top defensive end prospects in the NFL Draft. He is highly likely to be a first day pick, but there is some
disagreement as to which round.

Pros: Tapp has a great motor and shows good burst off the line. He is a very strong, high energy player. Tapp was one of the hardest workers in
college football. He shows good balance and can get off blocks. Good against run and pass.

Cons: He does not possess the ideal NFL size, although he does have long arms. He does not have great speed and can be engulfed by huge, athletic
offensive tackles.

Jonathan
Lewis, DT, 6-1 1/5, 309

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Round 3, Pick 76
Great Blue North: #89 prospect
CNNSI: Early-Fourth Round
Draft Board Insider: Round 3, Pick 95
ESPN: #147 overall, 4th-5th round

Lewis was one of the top defensive tackles in the ACC this past season. He helped anchor one of Virginia Tech’s best defensive lines ever.

Pros: Lewis is a well-built player who shows good athleticism for his size. He was a very productive player in the ACC and arguably Tech’s most
important player on the defensive line. He rarely gets hurt.

Cons: Some scouts feel that Lewis’ weakness is shown when teams run right at him. He can still play with a high stance at times, despite having
less than ideal height.

James
Anderson, OLB, 6-2 3/4, 229

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Late Round/Free Agent
Great Blue North: #112 prospect
CNNSI: Late Fifth Round
Draft Board Insider: Round 7, Pick 214
ESPN: #109 overall, late Day 1 pick

Anderson was a very solid whip linebacker for the Hokies who saw his stock rise after an impressive showing at the NFL Combine.

Pros: Anderson is a very fluid athlete and was perhaps the best athlete on Tech’s team in 2005. He is very good against the run in space and has
steadily improved in pass coverage. He shows the ability to be a very good special teams player. Many NFL scouts believe he has very good potential.

Cons: Anderson will sometimes get caught up in traffic. Not a between-the-tackles linebacker. Needs to improve his strength at the point of attack.
Never an impact player in college.

Jeff
King, TE, 6-5 1/2, 245

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Mid-Rounder
Great Blue North: #249 prospect
CNNSI: Early Fifth Round
ESPN: #13 TE, mid-to-late rounds

King is one of the top tight ends in Tech history. Because of the lack of depth at this position, the Hokies could miss King more than any other
player in 2006.

Pros: King has a good frame and is a good overall athlete. He played basketball for the Hokies for one season and was an important contributor. He
finishes blocks and runs good routes.

Cons: King will not stretch the field. He won’t get many yards after the catch. He does not have the strength to matchup with some defensive ends
in the NFL.

Cedric
Humes, RB, 6-0 7/8, 227

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Late Round/Free Agent
Great Blue North: #158 prospect
CNNSI: Mid-7th Round
Draft Board Insider: 7th Round, Pick 220
ESPN: #19 RB, 4th-5th Round

Humes was one of Virginia Tech’s feature backs for the past two seasons, sharing time with Branden Ore and Mike Imoh. He also played fullback in
2002 for the Hokies.

Pros: Humes has ideal size for an NFL running back. He is well-built and strong. He has good speed in the open field, and showed an ability to
out-run defensive backs in college.

Cons: Scouts say he needs to develop as a pass-blocker. He won’t make many people miss, and is brought down too easily for a man his size.

Will
Montgomery, C, 6-3, 312

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Mid-Rounder
Great Blue North: #241 prospect
CNNSI: Late 7th Round
ESPN: #8 center, Late rounds

Montgomery is a versatile offensive lineman who played guard and center during his Tech career. He is a former walk-on.

Pros: Scouts like his versatility. He shows good awareness and knows what to do. He possesses solid athleticism for a lineman. He can pick up the
blitz.

Cons: He will never overwhelm defensive tackles in the NFL. He must rely on technique rather than strength. He won’t push the pile very far and
will get driven back into the pocket by stronger defensive tackles.

Jimmy
Martin, OT, 6-5, 303

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Late Rounds/Free Agent
Great Blue North: #234 prospect
CNNSI: Free Agent
Draft Board Insider: Round 6, Pick 197
ESPN: #21 OT, 5th-7th round

Martin started at offensive tackle for the Hokies since halfway through his true freshman season. He is a very experienced player.

Pros: Martin is a smart player and a solid athlete. Good at keeping his head on a swivel. He has the ability to get to the second level and make
blocks.

Cons: Martin needs to get meaner and develop more strength at the point of attack. He won’t blow anyone off the ball.

Marcus
Vick, QB, 6-0, 200

Projections:
NFL Draft Countdown: Mid-Rounder
CNNSI: Free Agent
Draft Board Insider: Round 7, Pick 255 (Mr. Irrelevant)
ESPN: #14 QB, 4th Round-Free Agent

Vick needed another year at the college level to develop his skills. He is a talented player, but will not be a high draft pick thanks to his
checkered past.

Pros: Vick is a mobile quarterback who can escape pressure. He is an accurate passer who shows great touch. He can make any throw on the field. He
is a versatile player who can also play wide receiver or possibly return kicks.

Cons: Vick has repeatedly shown that he is immature. He doesn’t handle the pass rush very well, losing his mechanics and turning the ball over.
He does not have the ideal height of an NFL quarterback.

Other Prospects

Other Virginia Tech players have the chance to be drafted, but are more likely to go the free agent route. The best prospect of this group is Justin
Hamilton
. Hamilton played running back, wide receiver and safety during his Tech career. He is a good athlete with a good attitude, which is
attractive to NFL teams.

Jason Murphy will likely be picked up as a free agent by an NFL team that desires quick offensive lineman who can pull and get to the next
level. As a former defensive tackle, Murphy possesses these traits. Other free agent possibilities include tailback Mike Imoh and defensive
tackle Tim Sandidge.

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