ACC Dominates 2006 NFL Draft

Share on your favorite social network:
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail to someoneGoogle+share on TumblrShare on Reddit

The 2006 NFL Draft had numerous subplots where the individual players were
concerned, but when it came to conferences, there was only one story this past
weekend: the ACC. The Atlantic Coast Conference set a record with 12 first-round
selections and never let up, eventually finishing first by a wide margin among
all conferences with 51 picks overall. No other conference even came close. We
crunched the numbers for you and have the lowdown on the conference draft race.

It doesn’t take Steven Hawking or even a math major to figure out that a high
proportion of draft picks came from the ACC. With 255 draftees and 51 picks from
the league, you don’t need to grab your calculator to realize that it was
exactly one ACC player for every 5.000 picks. The Miami Hurricanes and Virginia
Tech Hokies led the conference with nine picks apiece, second only to USC’s 11
in all of college football. The other ten teams in the ACC had 33 picks, an
impressive 3.3 draft picks per squad, even more impressive when you realize that
Duke, Wake, and UNC combined for just two picks.

Using Sports Illustrated’s online draft
breakdown by conference
(handily linked so you can blame them for any
mistakes) as a data source, there were 200 draft choices from the six BCS
conferences. The ACC had over a quarter of them and led the other conferences by
a wide margin in total number of picks (click the conference name for a list of
drafted players from that conference):


BCS
Conf.
Rd.
1
Rd.
2
Rd.
3
Rd.
4
Rd.
5
Rd.
6
Rd.
7
Total Teams Per
Team

ACC
12 6 6 6 7 5 9 51 12 4.25

Big
Ten
8 1 6 13 4 3 6 41 11 3.73

SEC
4 6 4 3 8 4 8 37 12 3.08

PAC
10
4 5 4 4 4 5 6 32 10 3.20

Big
12
3 4 4 1 3 8 5 28 12 2.33

Big
East
0 0 3 1 2 3 2 11 8 1.38

Totals
31 22 27 28 28 28 36 200 65 3.08

An interesting side note: Though Miami and Virginia Tech officially switched
conferences almost two years ago, and Boston College followed a year later, the
change still causes consternation in some circles. The listing of Big
East draft candidates
on SI.com included nine players from BC, Miami, and
Virginia Tech. The SI website mistakenly listed Will Montgomery (VT) and Jeremy
Trueblood (BC) in its list of Big East draftees (giving the BE 13) and didn’t
include them on the ACC listing, shortchanging the ACC to “just” 49
draftees.

Speaking of the Big East, Tech’s old league was crushed by the other BCS
conferences in terms of total number of players drafted (just 11, a distant
second to the 28 draftees from the Big 12) and number of players drafted per
team (1.38, far behind the Big 12’s 2.33 and less than half the BCS average of
3.08 per team).

Looking down into the top non-BCS leagues:


Non-BCS
Conf
Rd.
1
Rd.
2
Rd.
3
Rd.
4
Rd.
5
Rd.
6
Rd.
7
Total Teams Per
Team

CUSA
1 1 0 4 1 0 1 8 12 0.67

MAC
0 2 0 1 2 1 0 6 12 0.50

Mt.
West
0 1 1 1 0 3 5 11 9 1.22

WAC
0 2 0 0 0 2 0 4 9 0.44

Totals
1 6 1 6 3 6 6 29 42 0.69

The Mountain West, featuring draft picks from San Diego State (2), New Mexico
(2), and Utah (2), had the same number of players drafted as the Big East (11),
and almost as many players per team (1.22 versus 1.38 for the BE).

There is no question that the ACC ruled the roost in the 2006 NFL Draft,
particularly in the first three rounds, where the ACC had the most picks in each
round (12 in the first, six in the second, and six in the third). The point of
expansion was to establish the ACC as one of the top football conferences, and
though they have to make up ground in many areas, the sheer talent level and
player development in the league put it at the top on draft weekend.

Share on your favorite social network:
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail to someoneGoogle+share on TumblrShare on Reddit