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  1. #1

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    Solution to the 16th team question

    Since I'm an entrepreneur with my company pretty much on auto pilot right now, I'm able to waste my time thinking about this stuff (business side of college football has interested me for a while).

    Anyway, this is my solution to the 16th team question, operating under the assumption that Notre Dame joins as a full member (so this is year 2015 and beyond).

    Basically, the ACC reaches out to Penn State and Texas to add both full athletic programs along with Notre Dame. That puts the ACC at 17 full programs. However, Duke turns its football program into a hybrid independent/ACC like Notre Dame is doing starting in 2014. Since Duke will never realistically be able to compete in the new ACC, Duke goes hybrid, scheduling 4 rotating games (out of conference) with ACC programs every year, for an 8 year home and home with all 16 football programs. Then Duke schedules a mixture of Vanderbilt, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Northwestern, North Carolina, Kansas, Baylor, Arizona, UCONN, Lousivlle, Cincinnati, Navy, Army, Airforce, as well as a Stanford or UCLA here or there and some D-IAA teams. Basically, that's at least 8 games that will be on the ACC family of networks, and probably 10-11 every year. I actually think this would improve the Duke brand with Duke keeping a full TV revenue share (Duke bball is disproportionate in its value). It would become more like Navy (an average but national program with national following).

    This frees up the ACC to go to a 16-team pod format in football with probably Texas and Notre Dame in the same pod with Pitt and BC; Maryland, UVa, VT and PSU in the same pod; UNC, Syracuse, NC State and Wake Forest in the same pod; and GT, Clemson, FSU and Miami in the same pod. Texas would probably keep its game with Oklahoma and Notre Dame its game with Southern Cal. That would definitely make for some nice programming for our ACC TV partners.

    I can't even imagine the money payout for this.
    Last edited by Hateful Hokie; Fri Sep 21 2012 at 11:36 AM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hateful Hokie View Post
    Since I'm an entrepreneur with my company pretty much on auto pilot right now, I'm able to waste my time thinking about this stuff (business side of college football has interested me for a while).

    Anyway, this is my solution to the 16th team question, operating under the assumption that Notre Dame joins as a full member (so this is year 2015 and beyond).

    Basically, the ACC reaches out to Penn State and Texas to add both full athletic programs along with Notre Dame. That puts the ACC at 17 full programs. However, Duke turns its football program into a hybrid independent/ACC like Notre Dame is doing starting in 2014. Since Duke will never realistically be able to compete in the new ACC, Duke goes hybrid, scheduling 4 rotating games (out of conference) with ACC programs every year, for an 8 year home and home with all 16 football programs. Then Duke schedules a mixture of Vanderbilt, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Northwestern, North Carolina, Kansas, Baylor, Arizona, UCONN, Lousivlle, Cincinnati, Navy, Army, Airforce, as well as a Stanford or UCLA here or there and some D-IAA teams. Basically, that's at least 8 games that will be on the ACC family of networks, and probably 10-11 every year. I actually think this would improve the Duke brand with Duke keeping a full TV revenue share (Duke bball is disproportionate in its value). It would become more like Navy (an average but national program with national following).

    This frees up the ACC to go to a 16-team pod format in football with probably Texas and Notre Dame in the same pod with Pitt and BC; Maryland, UVa, VT and PSU in the same pod; UNC, Syracuse, NC State and Wake Forest in the same pod; and GT, Clemson, FSU and Miami in the same pod. Texas would probably keep its game with Oklahoma and Notre Dame its game with Southern Cal. That would definitely make for some nice programming for our ACC TV partners.

    I can't even imagine the money payout for this.
    Duke isn't going anywhere and we can't sleep on them. They might make a bowl this year.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by VPIGUY View Post
    Duke isn't going anywhere and we can't sleep on them. They might make a bowl this year.
    Wow, you completely missed the point entirely. Geesh. Northern Illinois and La Tech made a bowl last year, but that doesn't mean they could compete in an ACC with Penn State, Notre Dame and Texas, not to mention FSU, Clemson, Miami, GT and VT. The point wasn't to make a prediction about what WILL happen, but to simply offer a solution to the 16th team question, as has been discussed.

    As I said, I actually think this would be good for Duke to be able to schedule a lion's share of its games against its football peers--committed basketball schools and/or small private universities with far below average football facilities and recruiting. A pseudo independence would allow them to make a national schedule, to get on TV some and to actually win some games--and they would keep their full share of the football revenue. It would also open the door for the ACC to add 2 additional powers to its football rotation.

  4. #4
    BUGGZY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hateful Hokie View Post
    Wow, you completely missed the point entirely. Geesh. Northern Illinois and La Tech made a bowl last year, but that doesn't mean they could compete in an ACC with Penn State, Notre Dame and Texas, not to mention FSU, Clemson, Miami, GT and VT. The point wasn't to make a prediction about what WILL happen, but to simply offer a solution to the 16th team question, as has been discussed.

    As I said, I actually think this would be good for Duke to be able to schedule a lion's share of its games against its football peers--committed basketball schools and/or small private universities with far below average football facilities and recruiting. A pseudo independence would allow them to make a national schedule, to get on TV some and to actually win some games--and they would keep their full share of the football revenue. It would also open the door for the ACC to add 2 additional powers to its football rotation.
    Duke COULD compete if everything went right for them. Stanford competes in the Pac12. Northwestern competes in the B1G. Hell, Baylor is now competitive in the Big12 and Vandy is competing in the SEC. Duke just hasn't made the level of commitment to their football program that they need to....but they COULD. nothing is holding dook football back but dook. the money and brand name is there.
    "This no more resembles that than something unlike something else resembles that." - Loosely quoting PHNC

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by BUGGZY View Post
    Duke COULD compete if everything went right for them. Stanford competes in the Pac12. Northwestern competes in the B1G. Hell, Baylor is now competitive in the Big12 and Vandy is competing in the SEC. Duke just hasn't made the level of commitment to their football program that they need to....but they COULD. nothing is holding dook football back but dook. the money and brand name is there.
    Really? Baylor and Stanford both had 2 of the greatest quartbacks in college football history. If that's what Duke will count on to compete in the ACC then it could be a very long wait. I don't really see much evidence that Vanderbilt competes in the SEC other than playing a few competitive losses here and there. Same thing with Northwestern.

    Duke literally has the worst facilities for football in the BCS. I just don't see them realistically ever investing $100 million in football upgrades. Their football fanbase is simply too small and their revenue too little to justify.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BUGGZY View Post
    Duke COULD compete if everything went right for them. Stanford competes in the Pac12. Northwestern competes in the B1G. Hell, Baylor is now competitive in the Big12 and Vandy is competing in the SEC. Duke just hasn't made the level of commitment to their football program that they need to....but they COULD. nothing is holding dook football back but dook. the money and brand name is there.
    Yep. That's their problem. They don't try.
    "Knowledge is good"

    --Emil Faber, 1904

  7. #7
    BUGGZY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hateful Hokie View Post
    Really? Baylor and Stanford both had 2 of the greatest quartbacks in college football history. If that's what Duke will count on to compete in the ACC then it could be a very long wait. I don't really see much evidence that Vanderbilt competes in the SEC other than playing a few competitive losses here and there. Same thing with Northwestern.

    Duke literally has the worst facilities for football in the BCS. I just don't see them realistically ever investing $100 million in football upgrades. Their football fanbase is simply too small and their revenue too little to justify.
    Wake Forest won the ACC. Northwestern has played in the Rose Bowl. Stanford just beat USC-w for the 4th straight year, Harbaugh is with the 49ers, and Andrew Luck is on the Colts. i'm not saying dook could become an ACC power, i'm syaing they could compete enough to rise up to the top once in a while just like those other schools do. If Wake can, dook can.

    i'm not saying they will invest to upgrade their program. i'm just saying they COULD. when Coach K retires and Cameron starts to feel like the old run down gymnasium it is, dook is going to have to decide what to do in order to fund their athletic dept, and no sport generates more money potential than football.
    "This no more resembles that than something unlike something else resembles that." - Loosely quoting PHNC

  8. #8
    8792HOKIE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hateful Hokie View Post
    Really? Baylor and Stanford both had 2 of the greatest quartbacks in college football history. If that's what Duke will count on to compete in the ACC then it could be a very long wait. I don't really see much evidence that Vanderbilt competes in the SEC other than playing a few competitive losses here and there. Same thing with Northwestern.

    Duke literally has the worst facilities for football in the BCS. I just don't see them realistically ever investing $100 million in football upgrades. Their football fanbase is simply too small and their revenue too little to justify.
    Duke is planning a major upgrade.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/triangle/....html?page=all

  9. #9
    BUGGZY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8792HOKIE View Post
    so it's only $75M in football stadium upgrades...i guess HH was right.
    "This no more resembles that than something unlike something else resembles that." - Loosely quoting PHNC

  10. #10

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    PSU not leaving the B1G.

    Too costly to leave the B1G for them. Plus, they like it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hateful Hokie View Post
    Since I'm an entrepreneur with my company pretty much on auto pilot right now, I'm able to waste my time thinking about this stuff (business side of college football has interested me for a while).

    Anyway, this is my solution to the 16th team question, operating under the assumption that Notre Dame joins as a full member (so this is year 2015 and beyond).

    Basically, the ACC reaches out to Penn State and Texas to add both full athletic programs along with Notre Dame. That puts the ACC at 17 full programs. However, Duke turns its football program into a hybrid independent/ACC like Notre Dame is doing starting in 2014. Since Duke will never realistically be able to compete in the new ACC, Duke goes hybrid, scheduling 4 rotating games (out of conference) with ACC programs every year, for an 8 year home and home with all 16 football programs. Then Duke schedules a mixture of Vanderbilt, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Northwestern, North Carolina, Kansas, Baylor, Arizona, UCONN, Lousivlle, Cincinnati, Navy, Army, Airforce, as well as a Stanford or UCLA here or there and some D-IAA teams. Basically, that's at least 8 games that will be on the ACC family of networks, and probably 10-11 every year. I actually think this would improve the Duke brand with Duke keeping a full TV revenue share (Duke bball is disproportionate in its value). It would become more like Navy (an average but national program with national following).

    This frees up the ACC to go to a 16-team pod format in football with probably Texas and Notre Dame in the same pod with Pitt and BC; Maryland, UVa, VT and PSU in the same pod; UNC, Syracuse, NC State and Wake Forest in the same pod; and GT, Clemson, FSU and Miami in the same pod. Texas would probably keep its game with Oklahoma and Notre Dame its game with Southern Cal. That would definitely make for some nice programming for our ACC TV partners.

    I can't even imagine the money payout for this.

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