Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Pylons View Post
    I could go for that.

    Although, I might just prefer that the professional leagues get rid of any age-oriented requirements (beyond general employment law).

    You think you can play for the NFL right out of HS? Go for it. Takes away some of the "we're not allowed to profit from our athletic stardom" argument...if you're that good, go be a pro.
    The professional leagues can get rid of any age-oriented requirements and still have a minor league system. In theory, a high schooler could be drafted by a MLB team and be assigned to the MLB roster the day after he signs the contract. An advantage to having a minor league system is the professional organizations will be more committed to the development of the players since they are invested in their futures. Also, it would allow players coming off an injury a chance to get some game experience against less talented competition and in contests that have no impact on the postseason. For example if a player has a rehab start with an A, AA, or AAA affilate, then it will not have any impact on whether the MLB team makes the postseason or not.

    If the player's union have concerns about how the owners are using the minor league system, then the leagues could adopt the same contract structure as the NHL. A NHL player can sign either 1-way or 2-way contract. If he signs a 2-way contract, then he is giving the NHL team the right to call him up/send him down to the minor league affiliate as much as desired. If he signs a 1-way contract and the NHL team wants to send him down to the minor league, then he must clear waivers before the transaction is completed. If another team picks him up off waivers, then his current team has the right to match any new offers to retain him or refuse to match and let him sign with the new team. I believe his old team gets some form of compensation (i.e. in the form of salary cap relief) for him not clearing waivers.

  2. #12
    Go VT's Avatar
    Join Date
    October 07, 1999
    Posts
    4,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Pylons View Post
    if you want to pay football players, I think you have to make them just "athletes" and no longer "student-athletes"...make them employees who, if they wish to be students, have to apply to the university and be admitted under the same standards as anyone else...and if they're admitted, they pay for it just like anyone else

    as for the "they can afford it" angle...many schools probably would choose to afford it...some of those would do it at the expense of all the other sports that football supports...good-bye soccer, cross country, wrestling, tennis, etc...
    I am starting to question what an athletics program (like Div 1) has to do with a University? What sports has become to the higher education system sort of baffles me in ways I can't fully explain. I don't give any money to the Atheletic Department unless I buy a ticket. Do I enjoy Tech sports...yes. Any donation I make goes to the academic side (College of Natural Resources) except those I have made to the MV's.
    Cast off the shoes and follow the gourd!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Go VT View Post
    I am starting to question what an athletics program (like Div 1) has to do with a University? What sports has become to the higher education system sort of baffles me in ways I can't fully explain. I don't give any money to the Atheletic Department unless I buy a ticket. Do I enjoy Tech sports...yes. Any donation I make goes to the academic side (College of Natural Resources) except those I have made to the MV's.
    Athletics is probably the best advertising tool available to a university. Now it will not talk about all the degrees offered at the school, but it will at least grab a prospective student's attention. The hope is that the student will then do a little research (after the game) to find out more about the school (on the academic side) and see whether he/she may want to attend there.

  4. #14
    BUGGZY's Avatar
    Join Date
    August 15, 2002
    Location
    Annandale, VA
    Posts
    13,709
    Quote Originally Posted by NCHokie83 View Post
    If we go down this path, you will only see a very select few schools ever compete for any title. If you think what baseball has is bad, you'll be depressed when you realize what college sports will turn into. If you're going to start paying kids free market prices, just allow them to go to the NFL.
    good point, bad example? MLB has had 9 different World Series champs in the past 13 years. just saying...
    "This no more resembles that than something unlike something else resembles that." - Loosely quoting PHNC

  5. #15
    Pylons's Avatar
    Join Date
    August 25, 2005
    Posts
    7,003
    Quote Originally Posted by VTHokie2000 View Post
    BYU's men's soccer team is a professional team (plays in a lower level soccer league). As far as I know, the only NCAA member with a professional team. From what I have read, the soccer team is not factored in when BYU is making sure it is compliant with Title IX. So, I believe the same would apply to the other schools. Now the kicker is that Congress would probably just amend Title IX to force the schools to provide equal stipends to the women's programs as long as the schools are providing these programs with funding for maintenance (i.e. equipment, stadium, etc).
    Interesting...I had never heard that about BYU soccer. Based on quick research, they're a university club soccer team playing in an otherwise professional league, not a professional team though (i.e., their players aren't paid...or even given scholarships). The lack of scholarships is what takes them out of the Title IX equation.

    Also, it doesn't really matter if federal dollars go directly to an athletic program...Title IX is not specific to athletics...if the university receives federal funding directly or indirectly (i.e. its students receive federal aid), it is subject to Title IX (in all areas).

    Quote Originally Posted by VTHokie2000 View Post
    The 1 loophole that schools could get around Title IX is if the schools assume a sponsorship role to the specific program. Essentially the program would become a stand alone entity (for tax purposes) and the school would provide enough funding to remain the primary sponsor. By doing that, the school could classify the funding it uses for sponsorship as a "for-profit" category and still remain a nonprofit school. It would be no different than a city or county owning a golf course and making a profit from it. The risk to this model is that someone else (a private company, another school, etc) could outbid the school and become the primary sponsor. Doesn't the Florida Seminoles (instead of Florida State Seminoles) have a nice ring to it? Or what about the Ford Wolverines (instead of Michigan Wolverines)?
    I have had thoughts like that as well. More along the lines of selling the right to use the university name/logo/brand to a professional football team.

  6. #16
    Pylons's Avatar
    Join Date
    August 25, 2005
    Posts
    7,003
    Quote Originally Posted by VTHokie2000 View Post
    The professional leagues can get rid of any age-oriented requirements and still have a minor league system.
    Sure...I wasn't trying to comment at all on minor leagues...each pro league should do whatever it thinks works best for them.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    January 19, 2004
    Posts
    15,980
    I don't think that is entirely true. I seem to recall Logan Thomas talking about driving an old Camry or something. I also recall him saying something about not having any money to spend on anything because it was the end of the semester. The notion that all players have disposable income is, IMHO, not accurate. Now, do some players get some extras from boosters, agents, or by leveraging future NFL earnings (by getting a loan, for example)? Sure. But I don't think the typical FBS football player is legally paid so much cash by their university that they can buy a new car and drop $ all over the place.


    Quote Originally Posted by JoesterVT View Post
    these articles always miss the fact that these players already are getting paid, and very well. These guys have more disposable income than the average student and have all of their expenses taken care of. Ever notice how these kids that don't have 2 sticks to rub together at home have decent cars in the player's parking lot in short order? Rather than this proposal, how about the NFL start a 2 year development/farm program for the best players that don't want to (or academically can't) do the college thing?





    Sent from my RM-860_nam_usa_100 using Tapatalk

  8. #18
    Senior Member NCHokie83's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 02, 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,857
    Quote Originally Posted by BUGGZY View Post
    good point, bad example? MLB has had 9 different World Series champs in the past 13 years. just saying...
    Not really. The teams that are making noise in the playoffs are either teams that have gone on a bit of a spending spree or who have sucked for long enough to have their high draft picks accrue to the point where they have enough talented low dollar salary guys that they can't help but to be competitive. Look at Tampa, they were loaded with these kinds of guys, and now that they're all growing up to break out of their entry level deals, they're not able to afford them anymore, and the team takes steps back. As soon as David Price and Matt Moore are gone, their talent pool begins to dry up. As for the others, you have teams like St. Louis, Atlanta, Boston, New York, Philly, Detroit, LA (Dodgers and Angels), San Fran, etc all making the most noise during this time, and they are all the ones who spend out of their minds in terms of salaries. The Red Sox, Cardinals, and Giants have combined for 7 of the last 10 World Series titles (Bos - 2004, 2007, 2013, SF - 2010, 2012, StL - 2006, 2011) , and they have some of the higher payrolls in the game. And the ones that won in the years in between, such as Philly in 2008 and the Yankees in 2009, they also broke the bank to get the teams they had. And the core of the teams that faced these guys in the World Series also came from this group. Baseball has proven that in order to compete, you have to spend. There are just enough teams spending right now that it has the appearance of parity, when there really is a very distinct competitive line between the haves and the have nots.

    And the problem with college is that you won't have a draft where the worst teams continually get the best players like you do in professional sports. If you go to paying the players, you're going to enter an era like we saw in baseball where the Yankees could just outpay everyone and win title after title like they did from basically the 20's through the 60's, or like you saw in hockey with the Canadiens from the 50s through 70s. I don't want that, but right now, it just seems like we're on an unavoidable collision course with it.
    "I love it when you guys try to write off a Frank Beamer team -- no one is going to win this conference without Virginia Tech having some sort of say in it." - David Cutcliffe

  9. #19
    Pylons's Avatar
    Join Date
    August 25, 2005
    Posts
    7,003
    Quote Originally Posted by Go VT View Post
    I am starting to question what an athletics program (like Div 1) has to do with a University? What sports has become to the higher education system sort of baffles me in ways I can't fully explain. I don't give any money to the Atheletic Department unless I buy a ticket. Do I enjoy Tech sports...yes. Any donation I make goes to the academic side (College of Natural Resources) except those I have made to the MV's.
    I sometimes have similar thoughts.

    I think the way big-time D1 football and basketball operate skews the overall athletics picture.

    Athletics, in general, I think are a cool part of a well-rounded university. Having rather non-academic football/basketball programs helps other sports exist with greater quality than they could otherwise. And there are some side benefits to all of the sports involving marketing, sense of community, etc.

    We have donated to both sides...at this point, more to athletics for selfish reasons, but I'm fixing that We're also now earmarking athletic donations to non-revs that we enjoy watching

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Pylons View Post
    Interesting...I had never heard that about BYU soccer. Based on quick research, they're a university club soccer team playing in an otherwise professional league, not a professional team though (i.e., their players aren't paid...or even given scholarships). The lack of scholarships is what takes them out of the Title IX equation.
    It is a professional team though because it is considered a "franchise."

    "BYU was the first University sponsored soccer program to ever purchase a franchise and that will compete at a level considered higher than NCAA soccer in the pyramid of US soccer development."

    Also, it does appear that some of the players do receive some form of "payment."

    "While the majority of players do not receive payment, the PDL prides itself on its professionalism in terms of its organization and the way the league is run, and its dedication to developing young soccer players, preparing them for future careers in professional leagues in the United States and elsewhere."

    If you look at the sentence before that, then it appears the soccer team has players from other schools play for them. By not paying them, then the players can retain their NCAA eligibility and play for their school in the fall.

    "As PDL seasons take place during the summer months, the player pool is drawn mainly from elite NCAA college soccer players seeking to continue playing high level soccer during their summer break, which they can do while still maintaining their college eligibility."

    http://soccer.byu.edu/content/pdl-0

    It appears the soccer team is governed by the BYU Men's Soccer Foundation (a non-profit organization).

    http://soccer.byu.edu/content/byu-me...-quick-facts-0

    Where things could get "interesting" is how much funding comes from Cougar football or basketball and the school.

    http://soccer.byu.edu/content/byu-mens-soccer-faqs

    If it receives support from the school, then I would think it would need to be factored to ensure the school is compliant with Title IX. Right or am I missing something?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •