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  1. #1
    Will Stewart's Avatar
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    Interesting article about paying college athletes free-market-economy style

    Always use "Reply With Quote", so everyone knows to whom you're responding.

  2. #2
    Senior Member NCHokie83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Stewart View Post
    If we go down this path, you will only see a very select few schools ever compete for any title. If you think what baseball has is bad, you'll be depressed when you realize what college sports will turn into. If you're going to start paying kids free market prices, just allow them to go to the NFL.
    "I love it when you guys try to write off a Frank Beamer team -- no one is going to win this conference without Virginia Tech having some sort of say in it." - David Cutcliffe

  3. #3
    Pylons's Avatar
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    if you want to pay football players, I think you have to make them just "athletes" and no longer "student-athletes"...make them employees who, if they wish to be students, have to apply to the university and be admitted under the same standards as anyone else...and if they're admitted, they pay for it just like anyone else

    as for the "they can afford it" angle...many schools probably would choose to afford it...some of those would do it at the expense of all the other sports that football supports...good-bye soccer, cross country, wrestling, tennis, etc...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by NCHokie83 View Post
    If we go down this path, you will only see a very select few schools ever compete for any title. If you think what baseball has is bad, you'll be depressed when you realize what college sports will turn into. If you're going to start paying kids free market prices, just allow them to go to the NFL.
    If colleges start to pay their athletes, then that could open Pandora's box to see some radical changes in the current structure. For example, instead of having a National Signing Day ESPN could televise the NCAA [insert sport here] Draft. Just imagine the nation's #1 recruit being drafted by the worst FBS team. Or schools trading away current draft picks for future draft picks. Since the athletes are now considered professionals, then (in theory) they are not at a school to obtain a degree. Also, that could open the door for teams to trade players, cut players, and sign them as a free agent. If college athletics starts to go down that path, then would there be any need to limit the length of eligibility a player has in a sport? I would think that as long as player is willing accept a salary from a school, then he/she should be allowed to be employed there as long as there is a contract in place.

    Personally, I would much rather see the NFL and NBA adopt the same model as MLB where a high school student has the option to enter the draft or go to college. If he goes to college, then he has to remain there for 3 years. Also, I would like to see the NFL expand the game day roster to 70 players and develop a true minor league system. It could be like the NBADL where teams share a minor league team or it could be like MLB's system (but only at the Triple A level). I believe if that happens, then maybe universities will come to their sense and realize that college athletics should not go down certain roads.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pylons View Post
    if you want to pay football players, I think you have to make them just "athletes" and no longer "student-athletes"...make them employees who, if they wish to be students, have to apply to the university and be admitted under the same standards as anyone else...and if they're admitted, they pay for it just like anyone else

    as for the "they can afford it" angle...many schools probably would choose to afford it...some of those would do it at the expense of all the other sports that football supports...good-bye soccer, cross country, wrestling, tennis, etc...
    Yeah- but the elephant in the room is title IX. How does this get resolved? Would universities be required to not only offer "opportunities" to women but also pay them the same?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Stewart View Post



    these articles always miss the fact that these players already are getting paid, and very well. These guys have more disposable income than the average student and have all of their expenses taken care of. Ever notice how these kids that don't have 2 sticks to rub together at home have decent cars in the player's parking lot in short order? Rather than this proposal, how about the NFL start a 2 year development/farm program for the best players that don't want to (or academically can't) do the college thing?





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  7. #7
    Pylons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mowglihokie View Post
    Yeah- but the elephant in the room is title IX. How does this get resolved? Would universities be required to not only offer "opportunities" to women but also pay them the same?
    I'm not positive anything would need to be "resolved." Except maybe we'd have to allow women to apply for the job of "football player."

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JoesterVT View Post
    Rather than this proposal, how about the NFL start a 2 year development/farm program for the best players that don't want to (or academically can't) do the college thing?
    I think that just waters down the quality of college football. Now that may actually lower disparity between all teams but if everyone played like Harvard I don't know that it would be wildly popular...

  9. #9
    Pylons's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTHokie2000 View Post
    Personally, I would much rather see the NFL and NBA adopt the same model as MLB where a high school student has the option to enter the draft or go to college. If he goes to college, then he has to remain there for 3 years. Also, I would like to see the NFL expand the game day roster to 70 players and develop a true minor league system. It could be like the NBADL where teams share a minor league team or it could be like MLB's system (but only at the Triple A level). I believe if that happens, then maybe universities will come to their sense and realize that college athletics should not go down certain roads.
    I could go for that.

    Although, I might just prefer that the professional leagues get rid of any age-oriented requirements (beyond general employment law).

    You think you can play for the NFL right out of HS? Go for it. Takes away some of the "we're not allowed to profit from our athletic stardom" argument...if you're that good, go be a pro.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mowglihokie View Post
    Yeah- but the elephant in the room is title IX. How does this get resolved? Would universities be required to not only offer "opportunities" to women but also pay them the same?
    BYU's men's soccer team is a professional team (plays in a lower level soccer league). As far as I know, the only NCAA member with a professional team. From what I have read, the soccer team is not factored in when BYU is making sure it is compliant with Title IX. So, I believe the same would apply to the other schools. Now the kicker is that Congress would probably just amend Title IX to force the schools to provide equal stipends to the women's programs as long as the schools are providing these programs with funding for maintenance (i.e. equipment, stadium, etc).

    The 1 loophole that schools could get around Title IX is if the schools assume a sponsorship role to the specific program. Essentially the program would become a stand alone entity (for tax purposes) and the school would provide enough funding to remain the primary sponsor. By doing that, the school could classify the funding it uses for sponsorship as a "for-profit" category and still remain a nonprofit school. It would be no different than a city or county owning a golf course and making a profit from it. The risk to this model is that someone else (a private company, another school, etc) could outbid the school and become the primary sponsor. Doesn't the Florida Seminoles (instead of Florida State Seminoles) have a nice ring to it? Or what about the Ford Wolverines (instead of Michigan Wolverines)?

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