Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Edgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 05, 2001
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    49,228
    I see the USC-W interns driving Ferraris, Lamborghinis, & Maseratis, living in oceanfront condos in Malibu, etc., SEC interns driving Porsches, Mercedes & BMWs...

    Quote Originally Posted by BUGGZY View Post
    why don't they just reclassify Football as a paid internship like other jobs on campus, and determine a fair pay rate, and just pay them as university employees? the NCAA could regulate/cap this to ensure schools don't try one upping each other (and i know most schools would just pay the cap).

    This would teach kids how to manage money, pay/file tax returns, save/invest, etc. i feel like a stipend would be paid out in a lump sum and be spent on stupid stuff before the first day of school comes around more often than not.

    i'm sure i'm oversimplifying, but aren't athletes essentially marketing representatives for the university? why not pay them as such (while taking into consideration the fact they already have a scholarship and other benefits)?
    "You start a conversation you can't even finish it
    You're talkin' a lot, but you're not sayin' anything
    When I have nothing to say, my lips are sealed
    Say something once, why say it again?"
    - David Byrne

  2. #12

    Join Date
    December 22, 2002
    Posts
    4,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Line Hokie View Post
    I guess there's 2 sides to everything. Most students pay for their tuition. Some students don't even get paid for their internships. I had 2 internships that barely paid above minimum wage and I didn't make enough money to pay for my apartment, food, and travel. I lost money but gained valuable work experience. Some students get paid well while other don't get paid at all. College athletes get paid through their tuition, tutoring services, medical, and stipend.

    I agree that college athletes are marketing representatives for their schools but it works the other way too. Student athletes choose to attend certain universities so they can receive the exposure and coaching they need to get to the next level (pros). College recruiters mention this to every big time athlete. "Come to Alabama and win national championships, plus your chances to make the NFL will be better." "Play for Kentucky and receive national exposure that will get you quickly into the NBA."

    I don't have a problem with a $2,000 stipend but I feel it could lead to more problems and corruption. The NCAA is the problem and has been for a long time. The NCAA should be completely overhauled before we start talking about paying college athletes.
    The 2K is FAR below minimum wage for these athletes as well. It just helps them considering they can't have another job during much of the season. Actually, a football player probably can't have a job at all during Fall and Spring semesters nowadays.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    December 22, 2002
    Posts
    4,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Will Stewart View Post
    I don't follow this stuff as closely as you guys do, but there's a school of thought that the big schools are using the $2,000 stipend as a tool/impetus for breaking away from the smaller schools .... creating a new division within the NCAA where athletes are paid that stipend, or just breaking away entirely.
    Yep, that's why I brought it up here. I've just read some posters suggesting this stipend would prevent schools like ECU, New Mexico, and Boise from desiring to be a part of this upper division. And I suppose what I'm throwing out there is that any of those schools would gladly pay the $500,000 to $1 million per year to be a part of that division. If it were in the $5-$10 million range, I could see many of them backing off, but $1 million is doable. I suppose a handful of schools may willingly drop out, La. Monroe or Arkansas St., but that would be it IMO.

  4. #14
    Edgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 05, 2001
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    49,228
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckd4vt View Post
    Yep, that's why I brought it up here. I've just read some posters suggesting this stipend would prevent schools like ECU, New Mexico, and Boise from desiring to be a part of this upper division. And I suppose what I'm throwing out there is that any of those schools would gladly pay the $500,000 to $1 million per year to be a part of that division. If it were in the $5-$10 million range, I could see many of them backing off, but $1 million is doable. I suppose a handful of schools may willingly drop out, La. Monroe or Arkansas St., but that would be it IMO.
    Wonder how many will drop multiple Olympic sports just to participate?
    "You start a conversation you can't even finish it
    You're talkin' a lot, but you're not sayin' anything
    When I have nothing to say, my lips are sealed
    Say something once, why say it again?"
    - David Byrne

  5. #15
    reestuart's Avatar
    Join Date
    October 07, 1999
    Location
    roanoke, va
    Posts
    59,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Line Hokie View Post
    I guess there's 2 sides to everything. Most students pay for their tuition. Some students don't even get paid for their internships. I had 2 internships that barely paid above minimum wage and I didn't make enough money to pay for my apartment, food, and travel. I lost money but gained valuable work experience. Some students get paid well while other don't get paid at all. College athletes get paid through their tuition, tutoring services, medical, and stipend.

    I agree that college athletes are marketing representatives for their schools but it works the other way too. Student athletes choose to attend certain universities so they can receive the exposure and coaching they need to get to the next level (pros). College recruiters mention this to every big time athlete. "Come to Alabama and win national championships, plus your chances to make the NFL will be better." "Play for Kentucky and receive national exposure that will get you quickly into the NBA."

    I don't have a problem with a $2,000 stipend but I feel it could lead to more problems and corruption. The NCAA is the problem and has been for a long time. The NCAA should be completely overhauled before we start talking about paying college athletes.
    I think the collusion between the NCAA and NFL is also a huge problem. The NFL requiring kids to be 3 years out of HS is a joke. It's little more than their way of having a developmental league without having to pay for it. The NCAA and schools benefit by having these kids stay there longer, so the quality of play stays at a high level. What is the real reason? Looking out for the student athlete? LOL. It also attracts a lot of the "corruption" that is going on. Reggie Bush doesn't have to give up his Heisman, and USC doesn't get in trouble if he simply is allowed to go to the NFL after his SO season. Same with a ton of these kids. The whole system is a giant mess.
    "Knowledge is good"

    --Emil Faber, 1904

  6. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    February 21, 2013
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckd4vt View Post
    And $2000 is the number being tossed around. That is peanuts to every BCS AD not named Jim Weaver. We're talking billions nowadays w/ these TV contracts and playoffs. Anyhow, folks need to keep that in mind when we're questioning the desire and ability of athletic department s to pay them.
    $2000 is the number being tossed around here on TSL. That's the least of the numbers appearing elsewhere. Bowlsby says $2000 to $4000, and that it's too easy being in Div 1. Delany's range was $3000 to $6000.

    Bowlsby said: "if leagues wanted to toss an extra $2,000-$4,000 into the athletic scholarship package to account for the full cost of attendance"... "And I think the fact is we've made it too easy to get into Division I and too easy to stay there."

    Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/col...#ixzz2bvSi2xUI

    Delany said: all athletes — not just football and basketball players — need between $3,000 and $6,000 a year beyond a scholarship for regular living expenses.

    Embrace the $2000 number if you like, but I think the number will be as large as necessary to exclude the weak and marginal programs. There are countless other ways to spend the lesser teams right out of the club. Remember, they'll be writing their own rules.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •