Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Calamitous's Avatar
    Join Date
    February 14, 2004
    Posts
    864

    So with 65 AQ schools, who are the most valuable non-AQ commodtities?

    BYU and UConn seem to have a leg up on most of the non-AQ schools IMO. Then you have some schools that have made noise recently (last 10+ years) such as Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii and Cincinnati based on football success. And if you go farther back, some schools like SDSU, UNLV, Memphis, SMU and Houston probably feel like they belong based on football or basketball success. Now, some of the commuter schools like UCF and USF want to be in the mix, only to get stuck in the AAC. And then there are schools that once belonged to an AQ conference like Temple and Tulane (going back to the 60s) that will likely never get that chance again. And how do the Academies fit in and should they fit in?

    My other question is what is the magic number for AQ teams? Does it stay at 65? Does it increase to 80? Does the NCAA disappear and a new AQ college athletic alliance take over leaving the other 60 schools to fend for themselves in a "remnant" NCAA?

    I guess Tech, K State, Ole Miss and Mississippi State should feel lucky to be a part of the AQ club since none have ever won a team NCAA National Title in any sport.
    Last edited by Calamitous; Sat Apr 13 2013 at 06:14 PM.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    November 04, 2008
    Posts
    6,238
    In my Opinion, UCF and USF are very valuable. UAB could be in the right conference. These schools all have solid sports programs, large student bodies, and growing academic/research profiles. UConn and Cincinatti are in the mix somewhere, but I would put them behind the other two based on football potential and academic profile respectively. Ohio is a HUGE state. I don't why someone couldn't emerge from that MAC/AAC mix to be a second big time player there. Ohio U has a good academic profile.

    Out West, I don't know why the Big 12 doesn't covet Colorado State and BYU.


    Quote Originally Posted by Calamitous View Post
    BYU and UConn seem to have a leg up on most of the non-AQ schools IMO. Then you have some schools that have made noise recently (last 10+ years) such as Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii and Cincinnati based on football success. And if you go farther back, some schools like SDSU, UNLV, Memphis, SMU and Houston probably feel like they belong based on football or basketball success. Now, some of the commuter schools like UCF and USF want to be in the mix, only to get stuck in the AAC. And then there are schools that once belonged to an AQ conference like Temple and Tulane (going back to the 60s) that will likely never get that chance again. And how do the Academies fit in and should they fit in?

    My other question is what is the magic number for AQ teams? Does it stay at 65? Does it increase to 80? Does the NCAA disappear and a new AQ college athletic alliance take over leaving the other 60 schools to fend for themselves in a "remnant" NCAA?

    I guess Tech, K State, Ole Miss and Mississippi State should feel lucky to be a part of the AQ club since none have ever won a team NCAA National Title in any sport.
    Last edited by Buy These!; Sat Apr 13 2013 at 09:20 PM.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    September 23, 2001
    Posts
    8,806
    I agree about Ohio. Not sure why nobody talks about them. In addition to CSU, some other state schools I think get pushed aside too easily are Louisiana Tech, New Mexico, Nevada, & Wyoming.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buy These! View Post
    In my Opinion, UCF and USF are very valuable. UAB could be in the right conference. These schools all have solid sports programs, large student bodies, and growing academic/research profiles. UConn and Cincinatti are in the mix somewhere, but I would put them behind the other two based on football potential and academic profile respectively. Ohio is a HUGE state. I don't why someone couldn't emerge from that MAC/AAC mix to be a second big time player there. Ohio U has a good academic profile.

    Out West, I don't know whey the Big 12 doesn't covet Colorado State and BYU.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    November 04, 2008
    Posts
    6,238
    Quote Originally Posted by hokieball View Post
    I agree about Ohio. Not sure why nobody talks about them. In addition to CSU, some other state schools I think get pushed aside too easily are Louisiana Tech, New Mexico, Nevada, & Wyoming.
    I love Wyoming's campus and athletic facilities, the sports venues are in close to main campus like VT. Terribly small population in that state though.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    November 04, 2008
    Posts
    6,238
    Quote Originally Posted by hokieball View Post
    I agree about Ohio. Not sure why nobody talks about them. In addition to CSU, some other state schools I think get pushed aside too easily are Louisiana Tech, New Mexico, Nevada, & Wyoming.
    Ohio has a very ACC-like profile. They would be a nice fit IMO. http://www.ohio.edu/focus/

  6. #6

    Join Date
    January 01, 2005
    Posts
    1,479
    while the sport does not have enough teams for NCAA sanctions.......VT won two national titles (back to back) in weightlifting during late 70's. They were referred to as club sports at that time....(ie no scholies etc ---all volunteer---Mike Gentry may have had some input at the time or even been on the team)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    June 05, 2003
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by Calamitous View Post
    BYU and UConn seem to have a leg up on most of the non-AQ schools IMO. Then you have some schools that have made noise recently (last 10+ years) such as Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii and Cincinnati based on football success. And if you go farther back, some schools like SDSU, UNLV, Memphis, SMU and Houston probably feel like they belong based on football or basketball success. Now, some of the commuter schools like UCF and USF want to be in the mix, only to get stuck in the AAC. And then there are schools that once belonged to an AQ conference like Temple and Tulane (going back to the 60s) that will likely never get that chance again. And how do the Academies fit in and should they fit in?

    My other question is what is the magic number for AQ teams? Does it stay at 65? Does it increase to 80? Does the NCAA disappear and a new AQ college athletic alliance take over leaving the other 60 schools to fend for themselves in a "remnant" NCAA?

    I guess Tech, K State, Ole Miss and Mississippi State should feel lucky to be a part of the AQ club since none have ever won a team NCAA National Title in any sport.
    While they are not really an attractive addition to the ACC because of geography (already have 4 NC schools) as well as academics, East Carolina University should be attractive to someone. When trying to quantify value there are a lot of measurements, but ECU averages 45,000+ for their home football games consistently. That's more than USF, UCF, Cincinnati, and Connecticut.

    ECU often gets lost because they have traditionally not been competitive in Men's basketball, but they just won the CIT tournament last month and are improving. They are going into the AAC, former Big East, so maybe they will get a little more publicity. They kind of get lost because the North Carolina ACC schools get all the attention.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    December 22, 2002
    Posts
    4,351
    Quote Originally Posted by Buy These! View Post
    In my Opinion, UCF and USF are very valuable. UAB could be in the right conference. These schools all have solid sports programs, large student bodies, and growing academic/research profiles. UConn and Cincinatti are in the mix somewhere, but I would put them behind the other two based on football potential and academic profile respectively. Ohio is a HUGE state. I don't why someone couldn't emerge from that MAC/AAC mix to be a second big time player there. Ohio U has a good academic profile.

    Out West, I don't know why the Big 12 doesn't covet Colorado State and BYU.
    UCONN, BYU, UNLV, Cinn, USF, Boise & Wyoming. In that order. I think those would provide Us in the majority of the country that could be competitive.

  9. #9
    Old Line Hokie's Avatar
    Join Date
    January 05, 2001
    Location
    3659′36″N 7813′30″W
    Posts
    3,481
    Quote Originally Posted by Calamitous View Post
    BYU and UConn seem to have a leg up on most of the non-AQ schools IMO. Then you have some schools that have made noise recently (last 10+ years) such as Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii and Cincinnati based on football success. And if you go farther back, some schools like SDSU, UNLV, Memphis, SMU and Houston probably feel like they belong based on football or basketball success. Now, some of the commuter schools like UCF and USF want to be in the mix, only to get stuck in the AAC. And then there are schools that once belonged to an AQ conference like Temple and Tulane (going back to the 60s) that will likely never get that chance again. And how do the Academies fit in and should they fit in?

    My other question is what is the magic number for AQ teams? Does it stay at 65? Does it increase to 80? Does the NCAA disappear and a new AQ college athletic alliance take over leaving the other 60 schools to fend for themselves in a "remnant" NCAA?

    I guess Tech, K State, Ole Miss and Mississippi State should feel lucky to be a part of the AQ club since none have ever won a team NCAA National Title in any sport.
    Most Valuable, not in any particular order:
    San Diego State - Best remaining school in the nation's most populated state
    Boise State - If FOOTBALL is driving realignment.
    BYU - Has nationwide fan base
    Colorado State - Another school in a growing state
    Houston - One of nation's largest TV markets in football crazy state
    South Florida - Fast growing TV market in football crazy state
    Central Florida - Same as South Florida
    UConn - Best combined men's-women's basketball program in nation. Loyal fan base. Close to NYC.
    Cincinnati - Would give conference a member in Big 10 Territory. Appear dedicated to improving athletic programs/facilities
    UNLV - Building NFL-type football stadium. Growing city. Seem like perfect fit for Pac 12 expansion.

    Others with Potential:
    Fresno State, Southern Miss, Tulane. LA Tech, Memphis, ECU, Navy, Air Force Academy, Army, SMU, Tulsa, UAB, Ohio U., N. Illinois, and Hawaii.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    November 21, 2008
    Posts
    5,086
    Quote Originally Posted by Calamitous View Post
    BYU and UConn seem to have a leg up on most of the non-AQ schools IMO. Then you have some schools that have made noise recently (last 10+ years) such as Boise State, Fresno State, Hawaii and Cincinnati based on football success. And if you go farther back, some schools like SDSU, UNLV, Memphis, SMU and Houston probably feel like they belong based on football or basketball success. Now, some of the commuter schools like UCF and USF want to be in the mix, only to get stuck in the AAC. And then there are schools that once belonged to an AQ conference like Temple and Tulane (going back to the 60s) that will likely never get that chance again. And how do the Academies fit in and should they fit in?

    My other question is what is the magic number for AQ teams? Does it stay at 65? Does it increase to 80? Does the NCAA disappear and a new AQ college athletic alliance take over leaving the other 60 schools to fend for themselves in a "remnant" NCAA?

    I guess Tech, K State, Ole Miss and Mississippi State should feel lucky to be a part of the AQ club since none have ever won a team NCAA National Title in any sport.
    My top 5 are BYU, UConn, Boise State, Cincinnati, and San Diego State with my wildcard of Ohio University.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •